Trust the skill & experience of Pinellas County's most advanced & fully capable cardiac electrophysiologist

516 Lakeview Road, Villa 5
Clearwater, FL 33756
Phone: (727) 587-6999 | Fax: (727) 259-7818
Heart Failure: Making Changes to Your DietInsuficiencia card­aca: Cambios en la dieta

Heart Failure: Making Changes to Your Diet

When you have heart failure, excess fluid is more likely to build up in your body. This makes the heart work harder to pump blood. Fluid buildup also causes symptoms such as shortness of breath and edema (swelling). Controlling the amount of salt (sodium) you eat may help prevent fluid from building up. Your doctor may also tell you to reduce the amount of fluid you drink.

Reading Food Labels

Read food labels to keep track of how much sodium you eat. Keep in mind that canned, frozen, and processed foods can be high in salt. Check the amount of sodium in each serving. Also, watch out for high-sodium ingredients like MSG (monosodium glutamate), baking soda, and sodium phosphate. Your healthcare provider will tell you how much sodium you can eat each day.

Eating Less Salt

Give yourself time to get used to eating less salt. It may take a little while, but your heart is worth it. Here are some tips to help:

  • Take the saltshaker off the table. Replace it with salt-free herb mixes and spices.

  • Eat fresh or plain frozen vegetables. These have much less salt than canned vegetables.

  • Choose low-sodium snacks like sodium-free pretzels, crackers, or air-popped popcorn.

  • Don't add salt to your food when you're cooking. Instead, season your foods with pepper, lemon, garlic, or onion.

  • When you eat out, ask that your food be cooked without added salt.

If You're Told to Limit Fluid

You may need to limit fluid intake to help prevent edema. This includes anything that is liquid at room temperature, such as ice cream and soup. If your doctor tells you to limit fluid, try these tips:

  • Measure drinks in a measuring cup before you drink them. This will help you meet daily goals.

  • Chill drinks to make them more refreshing.

  • Suck on frozen lemon wedges to quench thirst.

  • Only drink when you're thirsty.

  • Chew sugarless gum or suck on hard candy to keep your mouth moist.

When to Call Your Doctor

Call your doctor right away if you have any signs of worsening heart failure, including sudden weight gain, increased swelling of your legs or ankles, or more trouble breathing when you're resting or at night.

 

Publication Source: National Guideline Clearinghouse

Publication Source: Pulmonary Hypertension Association

Online Source: National Guideline Clearinghouse

Online Source: Pulmonary Hypertension Association

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-09-15T00:00:00-06:00

Date Last Modified: 2009-04-30T00:00:00-06:00

Heart Failure: Making Changes to Your DietInsuficiencia card­aca: Cambios en la dieta

Heart Failure: Making Changes to Your Diet

When you have heart failure, excess fluid is more likely to build up in your body. This makes the heart work harder to pump blood. Fluid buildup also causes symptoms such as shortness of breath and edema (swelling). Controlling the amount of salt (sodium) you eat may help prevent fluid from building up. Your doctor may also tell you to reduce the amount of fluid you drink.

Reading Food Labels

Read food labels to keep track of how much sodium you eat. Keep in mind that canned, frozen, and processed foods can be high in salt. Check the amount of sodium in each serving. Also, watch out for high-sodium ingredients like MSG (monosodium glutamate), baking soda, and sodium phosphate. Your healthcare provider will tell you how much sodium you can eat each day.

Eating Less Salt

Give yourself time to get used to eating less salt. It may take a little while, but your heart is worth it. Here are some tips to help:

  • Take the saltshaker off the table. Replace it with salt-free herb mixes and spices.

  • Eat fresh or plain frozen vegetables. These have much less salt than canned vegetables.

  • Choose low-sodium snacks like sodium-free pretzels, crackers, or air-popped popcorn.

  • Don't add salt to your food when you're cooking. Instead, season your foods with pepper, lemon, garlic, or onion.

  • When you eat out, ask that your food be cooked without added salt.

If You're Told to Limit Fluid

You may need to limit fluid intake to help prevent edema. This includes anything that is liquid at room temperature, such as ice cream and soup. If your doctor tells you to limit fluid, try these tips:

  • Measure drinks in a measuring cup before you drink them. This will help you meet daily goals.

  • Chill drinks to make them more refreshing.

  • Suck on frozen lemon wedges to quench thirst.

  • Only drink when you're thirsty.

  • Chew sugarless gum or suck on hard candy to keep your mouth moist.

When to Call Your Doctor

Call your doctor right away if you have any signs of worsening heart failure, including sudden weight gain, increased swelling of your legs or ankles, or more trouble breathing when you're resting or at night.

 

Publication Source: National Guideline Clearinghouse

Publication Source: Pulmonary Hypertension Association

Online Source: National Guideline Clearinghouse

Online Source: Pulmonary Hypertension Association

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-09-15T00:00:00-06:00

Date Last Modified: 2009-04-30T00:00:00-06:00

 

Patient Reviews

I was diagnosed with persistent AFIB several months ago. I found Dr. Norris by a referral from another physician. Dr. Norris scheduled me for a cardiac ablation without delay. He thoroughly explained the procedure, risks and benefits prior to the procedure. Dr. Norris and his staff exhibited exceptional professionalism and interest in resolving my AFIB. One month post-op I am rhythm and feel great. Thank you Dr. Norris and staff. I truly feel like I have my life back again.
-Ken Afienko

Read More
location_icon

516 Lakeview Road, Villa 5
Clearwater, FL 33756
(Two blocks south of Morton Plant Hospital )

Map and driving directions

ph_icon (727) 587-6999

fax_icon (727) 259-7818